Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Les interviews FZ

Modérateurs: boZZo, stef

Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Messagepar stef » Mer 12 Déc 2012 05:35

English version: (click on images to get full size - La version en français suit cette version anglaise):

Bill-Hansen-s.jpg
Bill-Hansen-s.jpg (98.96 Kio) Vu 9560 fois


LesFoilz (FZ) : Hi Bill. You are nowadays the designer of Switch kites but you have a long history in kite design and, more generally, in sail design. Those of us who followed your interventions on kiteforum may know some of your personal journey and career (for instance, the 3 struts kite project) but that would be nice if you could give us a short bio - in particular for our readers who only read French.

Pro Sport Elliptical.jpg
Pro Sport Elliptical.jpg (109.93 Kio) Vu 9560 fois


Bill Hansen (BH) : From an early age, I've had a natural interest and aptitude for things that fly or are driven by the wind. Kites, model aircraft, sailboats and boomerangs were always under construction with growing sophistication. My father had several airplanes and I learned to fly sitting on his lap and later earned my pilot's license at the minimum age. As a Junior High Student, I won the Illinois State Science Fair with a wind tunnel project entitled 'Facts of Flight' in which a tethered model plane could be actively flown. At University, I studied Applied Physics and after graduate school, I worked at UC Berkeley as a Research Associate on a Superconducting Electromagnetic Airborne Geophysical Prospecting system which was basically a large metal detector hanging from a helicopter. During that time I raced sailboats, flew airplanes, participated in skydiving and eventually began windsurfing in the early days of the sport with my own self-designed and built high-aspect fully-battened sails. After 5 years at UC Berkeley, I started a windsurf sail company named "Windwing' which grew into the largest US-based windsurf sailmaker. During that time I competed internationally in Speed sailing, windsurf course racing and slalom. Eventually we expanded to high performance stunt kites and set the standard for them which to some extent is still evident today. Around year 2000, I sold my interest in the company and became an independent designer/consultant for aerodynamics, kites and sails and have worked in this capacity for a number of brands and projects both inside and outside of the kiteboarding field. I also actively participated in open source kite design forums as a matter of self-improvement to push the limits of technology. It has been said that "if you do what you love long enough, someone will pay you to do it." I am blessed in that regard to now be a part of Switch.

MonoStrut-QuadStrut-Sails-Rapture-Sparka.jpg
MonoStrut-QuadStrut-Sails-Rapture-Sparka.jpg (1.06 Mio) Vu 9560 fois


FZ : On LesFoilZ, we are particularly interested in wave riding, with or without straps. One of your intervention I was very interested in was when you were commenting on the behavior of the switch method on the edge of the wind window (for those of you who want to read the post, look HERE). My take on your argument was that you were saying, amongs other things, that a wave kite should be a performance kite, and that comes with trade-offs. Could you tell us a bit more about what you think makes a good wave inflatable kite or even what would be a perfect wave kite, regardless of technology ?

Felix-Hawaii-MethodV1.jpg
Felix-Hawaii-MethodV1.jpg (76.86 Kio) Vu 9560 fois


BH : As a competitive sailor, the importance of upwind performance is obviously well-known. As an avid waverider and surfer, I found getting back to the line-up after a good ride (especially paddle surfing or with wind-blown current) was the worst part of the experience because of the time lost to the actual surfing. To me, a proper wave kite should go upwind extremely well if for no other reason than to get back to the line-up as quickly as possible. In addition, if the kite can operate well at the edge of the window, a larger range of motion is available to the rider to put the kite in an optimal position. Finally, kites that are capable of flying far to the edge also typically de-power well due to their ability to fly at low AOA (angle of attack.) But, that is not all of the equation. The final performance criteria for the optimal wave kite (other than re-launch and de-power) is fast turning without the loss of power and good drift down the line. We also wanted a powerful kite for the size because smaller kites are simply more maneuverable (and fun.) It is easy to make a kite sit back and turn fast in a pivotal power-losing way and there are many on the market. But, our vision includes a fast sweeping turn without losing power (which can be regulated by sheeting out.) Working with Felix in Hawaii, the criteria we sought were: Fast, non-pivotal powerful turning; excellent upwind ability; predictable drift; maximum de-power; easy re-launch; moderate bar pressure (so you can 'feel' the kite.) To us, this is what makes a great wave kite.

FZ : To what extent do you think you have achieved your goals? (I still have to try the method, it is on my must-do list)

BH : In the first version of the Switch Method (V1) we achieved most but at the sacrifice of higher bar pressure and tricky handling in gusty winds for less skilled riders. A kite which finds itself at the edge of the window is subject to natural instability due to the window expanding and contracting as the velocity and direction changes in gusts. In some cases. the kite simply finds itself beyond the edge of the effective instantaneous window. Subsequently, the Method V2 has been developed to allow adjustable bar pressure and better stability in gusts while overhead or at the edge. We believe we have retained the positives of the Method V1 while eliminating the negatives to open up the user profile to less-skilled, bar pressure sensitive riders. The response from our wave-riding Method testers has been unanimous.

Method-V2-Testing.jpg
Method-V2-Testing.jpg (99.05 Kio) Vu 9560 fois


FZ : With the increasing interest in wave riding, things are likely to evolve, and in particular the demand from the riders. As a brand close to riders (and to some extent made by riders), do you have some ideas about what would be the future of wave kites?

BH : At this point, even as idealistic as we can be, we find ourselves having trouble imagining how to improve it - at least for wave riding. We have already made some protos with differing parameters that perform very well but are not significantly better. Our immediate efforts and testing is with improved materials and construction which often impacts performance (both positively and negatively.) As the coming season progresses, we will listen to the riders and when we see a consensus of opinion, we will work to address them. This is how we see the best progress being made. One must also note that as the boards and riding styles evolve, the kites will follow (or possibly lead) the progress.

FZ : On lesFoilz.com, we are mixing (happily, at least up to now) tubes and foil kites. Some of us are even using exclusively foil kites in waves. Did you ever considered foil kite design?

BH : Yes. I have designed numerous 2-line, 3-line and 4-line foils for many years including the popular Slingshot 'B' series and others including but not limited to the Elliot Sigma Sport and Windwing Skyfoil models. At Switch, we are currently in production with 2-Line 1.5, 2.5 & 3.5sqm foils and nearing production on 4-line 7, 9 & 11sqm de-powerable foils. I have also previously made 4-Line ram-air 'C'-shaped sledfoils which were released to open source kite-design forums.

Foil&Method Hawaii Testing.jpg
Foil&Method Hawaii Testing.jpg (87.81 Kio) Vu 9560 fois


FZ : Wow … nearing production on 4-line 7, 9 & 11sqm de-powerable foils! You take us by surprise! Could you tell us more about these foilkites? Open or closed cells? Are you thinking about snow kiting with Switchkites?

BH : Switch is very interested in all aspects of kiting including snowkiting, buggy and landboarding. The 2-liners are open cells with closed wingtips to avoid collecting debris when dragging a wingtip. We view them as a progression from a fun 'trainer' in the 1.5sqm to a simple and basic landboard or snowkite in the 3.5 version (wind permitting due to square area.) The sheetable 4-liners we will be testing in the near future have a unique NACA inlet vent with interior valve flaps. To my knowledge no one has made such an inlet vent/valve in ram-air foils. If they do not work we will revert to the open-front inlet vents common to other foils and our previous prototypes. We are using a 2-pulley 'speed system' on the 4-liners for de-power / sheeting and our standard Switch control bar. The 4-line kites are relatively higher aspect than some (but not all) of the popular snowkites on the market. We are not planning on promoting them for water use but expect some enthusiasts will no doubt use them that way.

Prime-1.5.jpg
Prime-1.5.jpg (63.24 Kio) Vu 9560 fois


Vantage-9-Proto-Hawaii-2.jpg
Vantage-9-Proto-Hawaii-2.jpg (84.57 Kio) Vu 9560 fois


Vantage-9-Proto-Hawaii-4.jpg
Vantage-9-Proto-Hawaii-4.jpg (53.13 Kio) Vu 9560 fois



FZ : Do you think that there is a future for foil kites in waves (some of us tend to think yes but some R&D would be welcome for improving what is available at the moment as wave riding has specific needs).

BH : Far be it for me to say something is impossible but my sense is that it is a tough problem due to the complexity of the bridles, inlet valves and risk of crashing in the white water. Lack of structure seems like a primary limiting factor both while flying and in the case of a crash. I'd be interested in hearing the thoughts of the riders using foils in waves and where they see need for improvement before making an engineering analysis regarding a solution. In the meantime, my hat is off to those using them in waves!

FZ : Foils work fine in waves. New generations of foils do relaunch really fast and their soft structure can also be an advantage in the surf, because they tend to float above the white water. This said, a kite dropped in the surf has always a chance to be ripped off, and foils are no exception. At the moment, there are no production foil kites purposely designed for wave riding. Foils perform well but there are trade-offs which are not made for wave riding but with something else in mind. The challenge would be to build a foil kite that turns quick and tight with a constant pull (this is doable as concept air from Canada as for instance very interesting closed-cells prototypes - Peter Lynn chargers are also very quick and agile but some may argue that the kick in power they deliver when they cross the window is not very good for wave riding), that has a good depower (the system used by Concept Air and flysurfer that changes the arc of the kite is very good to that respect) but which is developed to be a production kite - so user friendly enough (this means stable enough for experienced riders - flysurfer kites are very stable for instance) with a fast relaunch (again flysurfer kites are very good to this respect). The main challenge is to put all these characteristics in one foil kite designed with no other thing in mind than waves (and traveling because foils could be very light and small companions of surfboards + small sizes wave foilkites could be interesting for snowkiting too). At lesFoilz.com we hope we plant some seeds in that direction.

BH : My sense from what you have said is that the primary deficiency of existing foils in waves is the character of the turn vs de-power. This is the same problem we encountered in developing the Method. Also, since foil-borne wave riding is a small segment of the market, the specific wave riding needs are probably being lost or diminished in the face of other more desired characteristics. That said, I do not believe a sweeping, controlled-power turn (where initiation is quick but with fixed or increasing radius) is undesirable to the general market. Rather, perhaps it just does not exist - at least so far in the kites brought to market. Our prototype testing has shown it is possible but requires some sensitivity on the part of the pilot/rider to not over-control the kite into a decreasing radius pivot turn. I believe this could be prevented by a limited control input system where the rider pre-determines the extent of deformation available. IMHO, part of the problem is rooted in how a typical foil control system deforms the kite to achieve turning and de-power. I personally like the way a 2-line foil turns in this regard and believe it may be ideal for down-the-line wave riding. The problem then becomes de-powerability because a too-powerful turn will rip the rider off his edge or board. Perhaps there is some room for R&D in this area.

FZ : You told me that you were currently in Hawaii for some testing with Felix Pivec. Could you tell us a bit more about this? In particular, on the next evolutions for your wave kites.

BH : We had a number of kites to test - not all entirely wave-oriented. Our recent test line-up included:

1) Pre-production Method V2's to finalize bridles and check other details for production.

2) Combat V2 prototypes with varying materials and canopy seam configurations for visual graphics. This is necessary as materials/printing and seam configurations have an effect on performance. It is not unusual to make subsequent changes in follow-up protos at this stage,

3) Element 11sqm prototype for comprehensive testing of all aspects for future development. This is the preliminary step on the way to a new model.

4) 2 and 4-line foil testing.

Felix and I test all of the kites before submitting them to HQ in NZ. Most models are then also tested there by Marc Jacobs and other Switch staff and riders. Our testing normally extends 1/2 to a full year in advance of release with several rounds of protos going back and forth from Hawaii and NZ as the effort progresses.

Switch-Foil-Moon.jpg
Switch-Foil-Moon.jpg (57.61 Kio) Vu 9560 fois



FZ : Thank you very much Bill for your time and answers, and for giving us the opportunity to see what's coming next!

Stef for LesFoilZ.com
Flysurfer speed 1 7m, speed 2 12m, psycho 4 4m, 6m et 10m DL, Concept Air protos 4.5, 6.5, 8.5 + quiver varié de surfs
Avatar de l’utilisateur
stef
Administrateur du site
 
Messages: 2394
Inscription: Lun 6 Aoû 2012 20:33

Re: Interview express Bill Hansen, Swithkites designer

Messagepar stef » Mer 12 Déc 2012 05:58

Version française:

Image

LesFoilz (FZ) : Bonjour Bill, tu es maintenant le designer des ailes Switch mais tu as une longue histoire dans le design des kites, et plus généralement, dans le design des voiles. Ceux parmi nous qui ont suivi tes interventions sur kiteforum connaissent peut-être ton cheminement personnel et ta carrière (par exemple, le projet de kite à 3 lattes) mais ce serait bien si tu pouvais nous faire une courte bio - en particulier pour les lecteurs qui ne lisent que le français).

Image

Bill Hansen (BH) : Depuis mon plus jeune âge, j'ai un intérêt naturel et des aptitudes pour les choses qui volent ou sont dirigées par le vent. Des cerf-volant, de l'aéromodélisme, des bateaux à voiles et des boomerangs étaient toujours en construction chez moi, avec une sophistication croissante. Mon père a eu plusieurs avions et j'ai appris à voler sur ses genoux et j'ai plus tard obtenu ma licence de pilote à l'âge minimum. Comme élève au lycée, j'ai gagné la fête de la science de l'état d'Illinois avec un projet de soufflerie intitulé "faits à propos du vol", dans lequel une maquette d'avion accrochée à
une corde pouvait voler. A l'Université, j'ai étudié la physique appliquée et après ma licence, j'ai travaillé à l'université de Californie Berkeley comme chercheur associé sur un système de prospection géologique aérien par supraconduction électromagnétique - qui était en fait un grand détecteur de métal suspendu à un
hélicoptère. Durant cette période, j'ai fait de la course à la voile, volé en avions, fait des sauts en parachute et finalement commencé le windsurf au début du sport avec des voiles entièrement lattées que
j'ai conçues. Après 5 ans à l'Université de Berkeley, j'ai créé la compagnie "Windwing" qui est devenu la plus grande voilerie basée aux Etats-Unis. Pendant cette période, j'ai couru en speedsail au niveau international, en course-racing et slalom en windsurf. Nous avons ensuite étendu nos activité aux cerf-volants d'acrobatie
haute-performance et avons produit des bases qui sont encore d'actualité aujourd'hui. Autour des années 2000, j'ai vendu mes parts de la compagnie et je suis devenu un designer/consultant indépendant en aérodynamique, aile de kite, cerf-volants et voiles et j'ai travaillé pour de nombreuses marques et projets de kite mais aussi hors du kite. J'ai aussi activement participé à des forums de conception de kite "open source" pour que je puisse m'améliorer et pousser les limites de la technologie. On dit "Si tu fais ce que tu
aimes assez longtemps, quelqu'un te paiera pour le faire". Je suis heureux en ce sens de maintenant faire parti de Switch.

Image

FZ : Sur lesFoilZ.com, nous sommes particulièrement intéressés par les
vagues, avec ou sans straps. Une des tes interventions qui m'a beaucoup intéressée était celle sur kiteforum où tu commentait le comportement de la Switch Method en bord de fenêtre (pour ceux qui veulent lire ce post, regarder ICI). Ce que j'ai compris de ton argument, parmi d'autres, c'est qu'une aile de vague doit être une aile performante, et ça nécessite clairement des arbitrages. Est-ce que tu pourrais nous en dire un peu plus sur ce qui, à ton avis, fait une aile parfaite pour les vagues, sans considérer la technologie utilisée.

Image

BH : Pour la course à la voile, l'importance de l'aptitude à la remontée au vent est évidemment bien connue. Comme rideur dans les vagues et surfeur avide, j'ai toujours trouvé que remonter au line-up après une bonne vague (en particulier à la rame ou avec le courant dû au vent) était toujours la partie la moins agréable parce que c'est une perte de temps, un temps où on ne surfe pas. Pour moi, une aile faite pour les vagues devrait très très bien remonter au vent, s'il n'y a pas d'autres raisons que de remonter au vent le plus rapidement possible. De plus, si le kite fonctionne bien en bord de fenêtre, alors il y a plus de possibilités pour le rider de placer sa voile à l'endroit optimal dans la fenêtre. Enfin, les ailes qui sont capables d'aller loin dans la fenêtre ont aussi un très bon depower dû à leur capacité de voler à des angles d'attaques faibles (Stef: Angle of attack -AOA- en anglais). Mais ce ne sont pas tous les éléments de l'équation. Le critère de performance final pour un kite optimal pour les vagues (autres que le redécollage et le depower) est un virage rapide sans perte de puissance et une bonne dérive dans la descente au vent dans la vague. Nous voulions aussi un kite puissant pour leur taille car les kites plus petits sont tout simplement plus agiles (et amusants). C'est facile de faire un kite qui reste bien dans le milieu de fenêtre et qui tourne rapidement mais autour d'un pivot et tout en perdant de la puissance et il y en a beaucoup sur le marché. Mais, notre approche est plutôt celle d'un virage rapide qui a plus d'envergure sans perte de puissance (la puissance pouvant être contrôlée en jouant sur le depower). Lorsque nous travaillions avec Felix (Stef: Felix Pivec, un des fondateurs de SwitchKite et également un pionnier du strapless bien connu), les critères que nous cherchions étaient une aile rapide, qui ne tourne pas sur un pivot et avec puissance, une très bonne remontée au vent, une bonne dérive dans la descente au vent, un depower maximum; facile à redécoller avec une pression en barre modérée (de manière à "sentir" le kite). Pour nous, c'est ce qui fait un super kite de vague.

FZ : Dans quelle mesure, penses-tu que vous avez atteint vos objectifs? (Je dois toujours essayé la Method, c'est sur ma liste de choses à faire).

BH : Dans sa première version de la Switch Method (V1), nous avons atteint la plupart de nos objectifs mais au prix d'une pression en barre supérieure et d'un usage un peu délicat dans les vents rafaleux pour les riders moins expérimentés. Un kite qui va facilement en bord de
fenêtre de lui-même est sujet à une instabilité naturelle due à l'expansion et la contraction de la fenêtre lorsque la vitesse et la direction du vent changent dans les rafales. Dans certains cas, le kite se trouve de lui-même au delà du bord de fenêtre effectif. A la suite de ça, la Method V2 a été développée pour permettre une pression en barre qui puisse s'ajuster et une meilleur stabilité dans les rafales quand elle est au zénith ou sur le bord de fenêtre. Nous pensons avoir retenu les aspects positifs de la Method V1 en éliminant les points négatifs pour permettre à des rideurs moins expérimentés ou encore à ceux sensibles à la pression en barre de l'utiliser. La réponse de nos testeurs en vagues de la Method a été unanime.

Image

FZ : Avec l'intérêt croissant pour la navigation dans les vagues, les choses vont très certainement évoluer, et en conséquence la demande des rideurs. En tant que marque proche de vos rideurs/clients (et dans une certaine mesure faite par des rideurs), est-ce que tu as des idées sur ce que sera le futur des ailes de kite pour les vagues?

BH : Au point où nous en sommes, aussi idéalistes qui nous puissions l'être, on a du mal à imaginer comment l'améliorer - au moins pour la navigation dans les vagues. Nous avons déjà fait des protos avec des paramètres différents qui ont également de bonnes performances mais qui ne sont pas significativement mieux. Nos efforts et tests actuels vont dans la direction de meilleurs matériaux et une meilleure construction qui ont souvent un impact sur la performance (autant en des termes positifs que négatifs). Alors que la saison qui arrive va avancer, nous allons écouter nos rideurs et quand nous verrons un consensus émerger, nous travaillerons dessus pour résoudre les problèmes ou demandes éventuels. C'est comme ça que nous pensons que nous pouvons nous améliorer le plus efficacement. On doit aussi prendre en considération le fait que les planches et les styles vont évoluer et qu'en conséquence, les ailes vont suivre les progrès (ou les initier).

FZ : Sur lesFoilZ.com, nous mixons (heureusement, au moins jusqu'à maintenant) les ailes à boudins et les caissons. Certains d'entre nous utilisent même exclusivement des caissons dans les vagues. Est-ce que tu as déjà tenté de concevoir des ailes à caissons?

BH : Oui, j'ai conçu de nombreuses ailes à 2 lignes, 3 lignes et 4
lignes pendant de nombreuses années, ceci y inclue la Slingshot 'B' series bien connue et d'autres comme (mais pas seulement) la Elliot Sigma Sport et la Windwing Skyfoil. Chez Switch, nous avons actuellement en production un aile à caissons en 2 lignes en 1.5m, 2.5m et 3.5m et très proche de la production une 4 lignes à caissons avec depower en 7m, 9m et 11m. J'ai aussi fabriqué une 4-lignes "C-shape" type luge qui avait été diffusée à l'ouverture du open source kite-design forum.

Image

FZ : Waouh … des caissons à depower en 4 lignes en 7, 9 et 11m presque en production! Tu nous prends par surprise! Pourrais-tu nous en dire un peu plus sur ces ailes à caissons? Ouverts ou fermés les caissons? Est-ce vous être entrain de penser au snowkite avec Switchkites?

BH : Switch est très intéressé dans toutes les dimensions du kite et ceci y inclue le snowkite, le buggy et le mountainboard. Les 2 lignes sont des caissons ouverts avec des oreilles fermées pour éviter de ramasser des débris quand les oreilles frottent. Nous les voyons comme une aile de progression, de l'aile de découverte en 1.5m à une aile simple et basique de mountainboard ou snowkite pour la 3.5m (si le vent le permet à cause de la taille). Le 4 lignes à barre depower que nous testons pour le futur proche à une seule entrée d'air dans le bord d'attaque de type NACA avec une valve intérieure à flaps (Stef: les entrées de type NACA sont notamment utilisées dans l'aviation. On les retrouve également sur la Ferrari F40 par exemple. NACA vient de National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, l'ancêtre de la NASA). A ma connaissance, personne n'a jamais fait une telle entrée d'air sur des ailes à caissons. Si elles ne marchent pas, nous ferons des entrées d'air plus communes sur d'autres caissons et nos prototypes précédents. Nous utilisons un "speed system" à 2 poulies sur la 4 lignes pour le depower et notre barre standard Switch. La 4 lignes est d'un ratio assez élevé par rapport à ceux que l'on retrouve pour des
snowkite populaires (mais pas tous) sur le marché. Nous n'avons pas prévu de faire une promotion pour un usage sur l'eau mais nous pensons que des rideurs amateurs passionnés les utiliserons très certainement
sur l'eau.

Image

Image

Image

FZ : Est-ce que tu penses qu'il y a un futur pour les ailes à caissons dans les vagues (certains d'entre nous ont tendance à penser que oui mais un peu de R&D serait très certainement la bienvenue pour améliorer ce qui est disponible en ce moment car la navigation dans les vagues a des besoins spécifiques)?

BH : Loin de moi l'idée de dire que quelque chose est impossible mais mon intuition est que c'est un problème compliqué du fait de la complexité du bridage, des entrées d'air et du risque de faire tomber le kite dans le break et la mousse. Le manque de structure me semble être un premier facteur limitant tant au niveau du vol qu'en cas de crash. Je serais très intéressé de savoir ce que les raideurs qui utilisent des caissons dans les vagues en pensent et notamment ce qu'ils pensent qu'il est nécessaire d'améliorer avant de faire une analyse technique d'une solution. En attendant, je leur tire mon chapeau pour les utiliser dans les vagues.

FZ : Les caissons fonctionnent bien dans les vagues. Les nouvelles générations de caissons redécollent vraiment rapidement et leur structure souple peut aussi être un avantage dans les vagues, parce que les ailes ont tendance à flotter au dessus de la mousse. Cela dit,
un kite qui tombe dans les vagues a toujours des chances d'être déchiré, et les caissons n'y font pas exception. Actuellement, il n'y a pas de caissons produits en série qui ont été conçus exclusivement
pour la navigation dans les vagues. Les caissons fonctionnent bien mais il y a des arbitrages qui ne sont pas fait pour les vagues mais avec un autre usage en tête. Le challenge serait de construire un kite à caissons qui tourne vite et serré avec une puissance constante (c'est faisable comme par exemple
prototypes à caissons fermés de chez Concept Air au Canada - les chargers de Peter Lynn sont aussi rapides et agiles mais certains pourraient leur reprocher que leur augmentation de puissance un peu brutale au passage en milieu de fenêtre n'est pas très attractive pour les vagues), qui a un bon depower (le système utilisé par Concept Air et Flysurfer qui change l'arche de l'aile est très bien de ce point de vue) mais ce kite devrait être aussi produit en série - ce qui signifie qu'il devra être suffisamment facile à prendre en mains (c-a-d qu'il soit assez stable pour des rideurs expérimentés - les ailes flysurfer de série sont très stables par exemple) et qui soit rapide à redécoller (encore une fois les ailes flysurfer sont très faciles à redécoller par exemple, même dans les vagues). Le challenge le plus important consiste à mettre toutes ces caractéristiques dans une seule aile avec rien d'autre en tête que les vagues (et le voyage parce que des ailes à caissons légères et petites seraient de très bons compagnons de planches de surf + les petites ailes de vagues sont aussi intéressantes pour le snowkite). Sur lesFoilZ.com nous espérons planter quelques graines dans cette direction.

BH : Ce que je comprends de ce que tu dis c'est que le premier problème des caissons disponibles pour les vagues c'est le type de virage requis pour les vagues par rapport au depower. Nous avons rencontré le même problème en développant la Method. Egalement, parce que la
navigation dans les vagues en caissons est un petit segment du marché, ses besoins spécifiques pour les vagues ont probablement été perdus ou diminués face à d'autres caractéristiques plus désirables. Ceci dit,
je ne pense pas qu'un virage non-pivot avec une puissance contrôlée (Stef: c'est comme ça que je traduirais le terme 'sweeping" qui veut dire que le virage a de l'envergure et que le kite ne tourne pas sur un pivot en freinant) ne soit pas désirable pour le marché en général. Au contraire, il n'existe pas - au moins pour les kites mis sur le marché. Le test de notre prototype a montré que c'était possible mais ça demande que le rideurr ne sur-controle pas le kite dans un virage avec rayon qui se réduise sur un pivot. Je crois que
cela pourrait être évité par un système qui limite les impulsions sur la barre avec lequel le rideur pré-détermine l'amplitude de la déformation potentielle. IMHO (Stef: In my Humble Opinion); une
partie du problème prend sa source dans la façon dont un système de contrôle d'une aile à caissons déforme le kite pour obtenir le virage et le depower. J'aime personnellement la façon dont un caisson à 2
lignes tourne et je crois que ce serait idéal pour surfer en descendant les vagues et le vent. Le problème devient alors la gestion de la puissance parce qu'une aile avec un virage trop puissant va déstabiliser la prise de rail ou désarçonner le rideur de sa planche. Peut-être qu'il y a quoi faire de la R&D dans ce domaine.

FZ : Tu m’as dit que vous étiez actuellement à Hawaii pour faire des
tests avec Felix Pivec. Est-ce que tu pourrais nous en dire un peu plus? En particulier, quelles sont les évolutions future de vos voiles de vagues?

BH : Nous avions un certain nombre d'ailes à tester - pas toutes faites pour les vagues. Notre travail de test sur les ailes incluait:

1/ La version pré-production de la method V2 pour finaliser le bridge et vérifier certains détails pour la production.

2/ Les prototypes de la version 2 (V2) de la Combat avec différents matériaux et coutures pour la canopée pour les graphiques. C'est important car les matériaux, l'impression et les coutures ont une influence sur la performance. Ce n'est pas inhabituel de faire de changements importants sur les prototypes à ce stade.

3/ Un prototype Element en 11m pour un test exhaustif sous toutes les coutures pour le développement futur. C'est la première étape vers un nouveau modèle.

4/ et des tests de nos caissons à 2 lignes et 4 lignes.

Felix et moi-même testons toutes les ailes avant de les soumettre à notre QG en Nouvelle-Zelande. La plupart des modèles sont aussi testés ici par Marc Jacobs et d"autres membres et raideurs de Switch. Nos
tests s'étendent en général sur une demi à une année avant la diffusion finale avec plusieurs étapes de prototypes faisant des aller-retours entre Hawaii et la Nouvelle-Zelande à mesure des progrès que nous faisons.

Image

FZ : Merci beaucoup Bill pour ton temps et tes réponses et aussi pour nous donner la chance de voir ce qui va arriver chez Switch!

Stef pour LesFoilZ.com
Flysurfer speed 1 7m, speed 2 12m, psycho 4 4m, 6m et 10m DL, Concept Air protos 4.5, 6.5, 8.5 + quiver varié de surfs
Avatar de l’utilisateur
stef
Administrateur du site
 
Messages: 2394
Inscription: Lun 6 Aoû 2012 20:33

Re: Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Messagepar stef » Mer 12 Déc 2012 06:23

Comme pour l'interview d'Armin, je vous propose de collecter quelques questions supplémentaire pour faire, si possible, un petit follow-up.

Stef
Flysurfer speed 1 7m, speed 2 12m, psycho 4 4m, 6m et 10m DL, Concept Air protos 4.5, 6.5, 8.5 + quiver varié de surfs
Avatar de l’utilisateur
stef
Administrateur du site
 
Messages: 2394
Inscription: Lun 6 Aoû 2012 20:33

Re: Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Messagepar boZZo » Mer 12 Déc 2012 08:33

Evidemment j'ai eu le droit à une petite lecture en avant première de cet interview et j'ai été impressionné par ton boulot Stef, le contenu est vraiment très intéressant et m'a donné des éléments de réponses au sujet du comportement de mes ailes dans les vagues. Merci pour ce gros boulot qui inclut une traduction !
Merci également à Bill qui s'est prêté au jeu et qui nous livre un bon moment de lecture :cool:
S3 12-Helix 8+6-Cult 4.5-Bolt 3-Spleene Zone V1-V2-Skim Newave-SweetPotato 5.4.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
boZZo
 
Messages: 3581
Inscription: Lun 6 Aoû 2012 23:15
Localisation: Marseille, Le Jaï, Cavaou, Napo

Re: Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Messagepar Marc » Mer 12 Déc 2012 10:26

Merci beaucoup, très très sympa cet article.

J'ai beaucoup aimé toutes les questions que tu as posées (et les réponses de Mr Bill bien sur).
C'est bien ce que tu lui as dit quand il t'as tendue la perche pour parler des attentes des riders sur les ailes à caisson en vague :cool:

Vraiment quelqu'un de très intéressant Bill Hansen.

J'ai bcp utilisé les Element en 7,9 et 13m et ce sont de très très bon kite, très polyvalents, performants et stables.

Juste la plage haute qui n'est pas formidable du fait qu'elles ne vont pas trop en bord de fenêtre (génant pour la 7...).

Dès que je peut me remettre à l'eau j'ai d'ailleurs en projet de me prendre une Method V2 6m...
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Marc
 
Messages: 1636
Inscription: Sam 27 Oct 2012 13:42
Localisation: A l'ouest

Re: Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Messagepar bisoc » Mer 12 Déc 2012 15:26

superbe boulot bravo stef, vraiment un forum de qualité :)
S3 12DLX, Rally 8/6/4, hB 5'7 bonapart, Skim North, GP Foil, mtb et autres 4 lignes.
bisoc
 
Messages: 1027
Inscription: Lun 20 Aoû 2012 16:04

Re: Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Messagepar wicahpi shakowin » Mer 12 Déc 2012 21:30

Merci Stef, bravo pour ce beau travail !! Image
Tu cibles bien nos besoins et le génie de ce Bill Hansen figure parmi l'une des clefs de nos espoirs.
Merci Bill Hansen pour toutes ces informations, merci aussi de prêter une écoute aux besoins des riders.
Ensemble, la multiplicité des idées aide à y voir plus clair en terme de besoins dans les améliorations et les évolutions d'un kite dans les vagues.
Foilzeurs, Foilzeuses ; réfléchissons à quelques bonnes questions concises. :-D
Image
http://popeyethewelder.com/archives/14673
It only hurts when you start pretending it doesn't.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
wicahpi shakowin
 
Messages: 4825
Inscription: Ven 14 Sep 2012 23:11

Re: Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Messagepar boZZo » Mer 12 Déc 2012 22:37

"J'ai aussi activement participé à des forums de conception de kite "open source" " C'est vraiment super comme principe :cool:
S3 12-Helix 8+6-Cult 4.5-Bolt 3-Spleene Zone V1-V2-Skim Newave-SweetPotato 5.4.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
boZZo
 
Messages: 3581
Inscription: Lun 6 Aoû 2012 23:15
Localisation: Marseille, Le Jaï, Cavaou, Napo

Re: Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Messagepar wicahpi shakowin » Jeu 13 Déc 2012 00:17

boZZo a écrit:"J'ai aussi activement participé à des forums de conception de kite "open source" " C'est vraiment super comme principe :cool:


Oui, bon sens ! ;)
Image
http://popeyethewelder.com/archives/14673
It only hurts when you start pretending it doesn't.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
wicahpi shakowin
 
Messages: 4825
Inscription: Ven 14 Sep 2012 23:11

Re: Interview express Bill Hansen, Switchkites designer

Messagepar bisoc » Jeu 13 Déc 2012 08:42

boZZo a écrit:"J'ai aussi activement participé à des forums de conception de kite "open source" " C'est vraiment super comme principe :cool:


ouais, pour avoir bossé dans l'opensource informatique pendant quelques années, faut aussi se blinder niveau licence/brevet pour éviter que des petits malins ne s'arrogent le crédit de découverte "opensource".

c'est mon coté pas fleur bleu :)
S3 12DLX, Rally 8/6/4, hB 5'7 bonapart, Skim North, GP Foil, mtb et autres 4 lignes.
bisoc
 
Messages: 1027
Inscription: Lun 20 Aoû 2012 16:04

Suivante

Retourner vers Le micro d'argent

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 0 invités

x